While Others Were Carrying Their Books…

… I was busy with both work and making questions for a quiz, which is why I haven’t been posting. Most of the interesting stuff I’ve come across in the recent past will find its way into questions rather than into blogposts, but here are some links to things that I’m not going to turn into questions.

Dr. Acharya Somuchidononanda Pandey has written about the ancient history of test cricket, and Dr. Mrs. Valentina Dimitrieva Pandey has written about the challenges which President-Elect Obama faces. Also, the comments of the Pandey family blog have led me to discover a remarkable individual named Bhanu Prasad. He is a socialist anarchist who is opposed to feminism, family life, the liberal English media, and as far as I can make out, everything and everybody except himself. He is almost like an incarnation of Jagadguru.

The NYTimes Wheels Blog has an old post about congestion pricing for parking, and how this is expected to greatly ease traffic congestion in San Francisco. Now, if only congestion pricing – or any pricing at all – existed in Bangalore. On a related note, Masabi is talking about how Bangalore desperately needs public transportation and pedestrianisation, but everybody is crying up and down about problems rather than suggesting solutions.

While on the topic of Bangalore, Madhu Menon has reopened Shiok and added a cocktail lounge called Moss. Baada and Hari the Kid ate at the new Shiok recently, and confirm that the food was as good as ever, and the ambience was even better.

Popagandhi and Lazy Lola are launching a video postcard website, where they’re sharing videos shot entirely on N-series handsets. They’re looking for sponsors as well as people to interview (chefs and indie musicians, this means you – Hari the Kid please spread the good word).

Skimpy has extended the Studs-and-Fighters theory.

Michael Lewis of Liar’s Poker fame has written an article about the demise of Wall Street (Page 1 of 9 here, single page view here). It’s more storytelling than analysis, and shouldn’t really be looked at as an explanation of the crisis. But because it’s more storytelling than analysis, it’s a delight to read.

As for the financial crisis itself, Vatsan has a solution. As it involves Tams, it is likely to be successful.

Normal posting will resume once I’m done with the quiz (currently, I have 24 questions and a long visual connect left to make). Wait for upcoming blogposts about the futility of regulation, the dhimmi nature of Yash Raj Films, and how Neal Stephenson is a twenty first century Kipling.